Communion

Communion

Some time ago I was commissioned by dear friends to create this painting, titled “Communion.” This evening in particular seems a good time to share this image as Christians around the world celebrate the Last Supper where Jesus commanded His disciples to remember His sacrifice with bread and wine. I decided to add a little meditation on the painting with my post, and found that as I wrote, what I wanted to say kept trying to emerge in verse. I was enjoying the process, so I went with it.  I was very hesitant to post my very novice poetic efforts here, but decided to go ahead, hoping that I will find some forgiveness for my literary deficiencies in deference to my message and intent.   Supper of Remembering A trinity of thorny-stemmed roses bleed soft red petals on white linen. The broken loaf awaits gouging fingers, open mouths, gnawing hunger. Mercy’s meal - gnashed, swallowed, savored in faith, becomes our healing. I remember You. The sunlit wine sits still until jarred by thirsty lips into shimmering ripples Pouring in, flowing down with holy rushing purpose - to wash, to free, to seal. Distilled from brutal crush, forgiveness pools forever in that bottomless cup. I remember You. At table, You untangle tightly twisted hearts’ knots with tender Groom’s hands And toss the dry, crumpled litter and empty shells of expired confessions Into the Fire that leaves no ash, only green, budding hope and crystal vision. I remember You.   ©Victoria McCall 2014...
Mystery

Mystery

From Continuum’s facebook page today, a poem from Billy Collins - a little reminder to leave room for the mystery in poetry (applies to all the arts!) and to proceed with exploring curiosity: Here is a poem about reading poems, written by Billy Collins, former Poet Laureate, in honor of his birthday, today. Introduction to Poetry I ask them to take a poem and hold it up to the light like a color slide or press an ear against its hive. I say drop a mouse into a poem and watch him probe his way out, or walk inside the poem’s room and feel the walls for a light switch. I want them to waterski across the surface of a poem waving at the author’s name on the shore. But all they want to do is tie the poem to a chair with rope and torture a confession out of it. They begin beating it with a hose to find out what it really...
Finalist!

Finalist!

Three of my paintings were chosen as finalists in the Still Life/Floral category of The Artist’s Magazine 30th Annual Art Competition. The winners have been notified (I am not in that group) but I am honored to have been selected as a finalist from over 6000 entries. Finalists’ names will be listed in the December 2013 issue which will feature the the winning artists and their entries. Some artists from the finalist group will be chosen for showcase articles in the magazine and online throughout the year as well as for spots on their calendar. Grateful! The Artist’s...
National Gallery of Art, DC   5/17/13

National Gallery of Art, DC 5/17/13

Got a break last week and enjoyed a half day at the National Gallery of Art in DC - saw three shows: Albrecht Durer, The Pre-Raphaelites and Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes…a bit rushed, but still an enriching visit! Albrecht Dürer   “Saint Eustace,” c. 1501   engraving From the National Gallery of Art: “Saint Eustace,” the patron saint of firefighters and anyone facing adversity, is Dürer’s largest copperplate engraving by far. It tells the story of Placidus, a Roman military commander who, while out hunting, meets a stag holding a cross with the crucified Christ between its antlers. Deeply moved, the Roman converts to Christianity and takes the name Eustace (the Steadfast). From the National Gallery of Art: In “Ophelia” (1851–1852) John Everett Millais imagined a scene that is only described, never staged, in Shakespeare’s play: the drowning of Ophelia, Hamlet’s lover. Millais began the picture outdoors and worked for months on the background, painting it on the banks of a river. He returned to London with this canvas completed but for blank sections in the center awaiting the insertion of the figure. The model, Elizabeth Siddall, lay in a filled bathtub to help him paint a floating body realistically. The painting exemplifies the Pre-Raphaelite poetic, psychological, and descriptive approach to depicting history and...